I'M A FREELANCE BIOEXORCIST

(intersectional) feminism or gtfo. spooky things, pretty things, food things, and cat GIFS fer sure.

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Reblogged from gonzothegr8

(Source: bryko)

Reblogged from madamecuratrix

madamecuratrix:

biomedicalephemera:

Dr. Mary Edwards Walker’s pocket surgical kit

Dr. Walker was the first female surgeon in the U.S. Army, serving during the Civil War.

She was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1865 by President Johnson, and remains the only woman to have ever won it, to this date. Interestingly, this high honor was awarded to her (and even had a bill passed in order to make her eligible) in order to recognize her service to the country…while making sure that she didn’t receive an army commission in retirement.

Indeed, she made less as a pensioner than the widows of most officers did, but she saw the greater honor of her Medal, wearing it every day until her death in 1917.

Walker also campaigned as an abolitionist (prior to the war), prohibitionist, and an advocate for dress reform, citing women’s clothing as “immodest and unwieldy”. She was arrested several times in the late 1800s for “impersonating a man”, because of her trousers and top hat.

Because Doctor Mary Walker was amazing.

Reblogged from arseniccupcakes

lordwanjavi:

Minibusts > Strogstuff (Tom Whalen)

Reblogged from paradiseprogram

Death By Hanging, 1968. Dir. Nagisa Oshima

(Source: arilou)

Reblogged from napoleanbonerfart

sourcedumal:

Michael K. Williams talks about an emotional moment on the set of ‘12 Years a Slave’, moving Arsenio Hall to tears.

The emotional and spiritual toll that this film must have taken on every single Black cast member…..

Lord….

(Source: klchaps)

http://blackfeminism.tumblr.com/post/81882630442/somewhatconfusticated-new-study-finds-that

Reblogged from arseniccupcakes

somewhatconfusticated:

New study finds that drinking doesn’t cause sexual aggression, predators target drunk women

"The reason this is so important is that the way we understand these dynamics has real-world consequences for how we approach preventing sexual violence. The myth that…

Reblogged from hannibaliskissable

nbchannibal:

April Fools Prank: Frame your best friend for murder.

happpily:


MY MAD FAT DIARY: A Masterpost 
Set in Stamford, Lincolnshire in 1996, My Mad Fat Diary follows the story of 16-year-old, 231 pound girl, Rae, who has just left a psychiatric hospital, where she has spent four months. She begins to reconnect with her best friend, Chloe, who is unaware of Rae’s mental health and body image problems, believing she was in France for the past four months. Rae attempts to keep this information from her while also trying to impress Chloe’s friends Izzy, Archie, Chop and Finn.
Series One
Episode 1
Episode 2
Episode 3
Episode 4
Episode 5
Episode 6
Series Two
Episode 1
Episode 2
Episode 3
Episode 4
Episode 5
Episode 6
Episode 7 (series finale!!)

UPDATED AS OF 24/03/14

Reblogged from rachelecateyes

happpily:

MY MAD FAT DIARY: A Masterpost

Set in Stamford, Lincolnshire in 1996, My Mad Fat Diary follows the story of 16-year-old, 231 pound girl, Rae, who has just left a psychiatric hospital, where she has spent four months. She begins to reconnect with her best friend, Chloe, who is unaware of Rae’s mental health and body image problems, believing she was in France for the past four months. Rae attempts to keep this information from her while also trying to impress Chloe’s friends Izzy, Archie, Chop and Finn.

Series One

Series Two

UPDATED AS OF 24/03/14

medievalpoc:

ARE YOU READY FOR THIS BECAUSE I WASN’T
Unicorn Cookbook Found at the British Library





A long-lost medieval cookbook, containing recipes for hedgehogs, blackbirds and even unicorns, has been discovered at the British Library. Professor Brian Trump of the British Medieval Cookbook Project described the find as near-miraculous. “We’ve been hunting for this book for years. The moment I first set my eyes on it was spine-tingling.”

Detail of a unicorn on the grill in Geoffrey Fule’s cookbook, England, mid-14th century (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137r).
Experts believe that the cookbook was compiled by Geoffrey Fule, who worked in the kitchens of Philippa of Hainault, Queen of England (1328-1369). Geoffrey had a reputation for blending unusual flavours – one scholar has called him “the Heston Blumenthal of his day” – and everything points to his hand being behind the compilation.
After recipes for herring, tripe and codswallop (fish stew, a popular dish in the Middle Ages) comes that beginning “Taketh one unicorne”. The recipe calls for the beast to be marinaded in cloves and garlic, and then roasted on a griddle. The cookbook’s compiler, doubtless Geoffrey Fule himself, added pictures in its margins, depicting the unicorn being prepared and then served. Sarah J Biggs, a British Library expert on medieval decoration, commented that “the images are extraordinary, almost exactly as we’d expect them to be, if not better”.

A lady bringing the unicorn’s head to the table (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137v).
The recipe for cooking blackbirds is believed to be the origin of the traditional English nursery rhyme “Sing a song of sixpence / A pocket full of rye / Four-and-twenty blackbirds / Baked in a pie.” Professor Trump added that he was tempted to try some of the recipes, but suspected that sourcing ingredients would be challenging. “Unfortunately, they don’t stock unicorn in my local branch of Tesco.”

The remains of the unicorn (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 138r).
-Sarah J Biggs (British Museum, London)

Reblogged from medievalpoc

medievalpoc:

ARE YOU READY FOR THIS BECAUSE I WASN’T

Unicorn Cookbook Found at the British Library

A long-lost medieval cookbook, containing recipes for hedgehogs, blackbirds and even unicorns, has been discovered at the British Library. Professor Brian Trump of the British Medieval Cookbook Project described the find as near-miraculous. “We’ve been hunting for this book for years. The moment I first set my eyes on it was spine-tingling.”

image

Detail of a unicorn on the grill in Geoffrey Fule’s cookbook, England, mid-14th century (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137r).

Experts believe that the cookbook was compiled by Geoffrey Fule, who worked in the kitchens of Philippa of Hainault, Queen of England (1328-1369). Geoffrey had a reputation for blending unusual flavours – one scholar has called him “the Heston Blumenthal of his day” – and everything points to his hand being behind the compilation.

After recipes for herring, tripe and codswallop (fish stew, a popular dish in the Middle Ages) comes that beginning “Taketh one unicorne”. The recipe calls for the beast to be marinaded in cloves and garlic, and then roasted on a griddle. The cookbook’s compiler, doubtless Geoffrey Fule himself, added pictures in its margins, depicting the unicorn being prepared and then served. Sarah J Biggs, a British Library expert on medieval decoration, commented that “the images are extraordinary, almost exactly as we’d expect them to be, if not better”.

image

A lady bringing the unicorn’s head to the table (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137v).

The recipe for cooking blackbirds is believed to be the origin of the traditional English nursery rhyme “Sing a song of sixpence / A pocket full of rye / Four-and-twenty blackbirds / Baked in a pie.” Professor Trump added that he was tempted to try some of the recipes, but suspected that sourcing ingredients would be challenging. “Unfortunately, they don’t stock unicorn in my local branch of Tesco.”

image

The remains of the unicorn (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 138r).

-Sarah J Biggs (British Museum, London)

uncle-deadward:

Tell me about it Edie…

Reblogged from grey-gardens

uncle-deadward:

Tell me about it Edie…